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AHH! I wasn't ready for this much snow!!

January 9, 2018

Ok, early in January and we've already had several snow squalls, and let's not forget Winter Storm Grayson. Your garden isn't cut back, your fall cleanup isn't done and there are still leaves on the trees. Now what?

 

Not to panic. Really, this is Connecticut. If you pay attention to the weather like we do, you'll see winter temperatures fluctuate quite a bit. It can be 20 degrees one day and 40 degrees a few days later. I've lived in Connecticut all my life and I can tell you that we HAVE had snow for Thanksgiving, but snow in early January is rare. I've also been landscaping professionally for 12 years and been an avid gardener for over 20. If you want to know if an early snow will damage your perennials, the answer is no. Your garden is already dormant, all except the evergreens. Any leaf tissue you see may be frozen, or even black, but the energy is already down in the root system, and like a bear, they are hibernating for winter.  

The leaves on the trees as you see here left on this Japanese maple, will likely stay on through the winter, but they will get pushed out at first bud break. They may gradually release more toward spring, but it's been windy and they're still there, so enjoy the beauty of the snow!

 

While many of our clients called in a panic, I reassured them everything will be fine. Matter of fact, if you look at the long range forecast, there are some days that are predicted to be in the 40's  - BEACH DAY!! Ok, not really.

These are just little snow squalls that don't really affect your garden very much, but it does create a pretty scene. It makes everything look like it's coated in icing. For now, sit back and enjoy.

It might feel like snowmageddon, but it's not.

 

 

Just remember how much snow we had in 2014, or at least I think it was 2014. We can handle a little dusting.

 

The heart of snow and ice in Connecticut happens from mid to late January. If you're looking for tips on how to prepare your landscape for the REAL snow to come, look no further! Here's a link to one of our blogs..

  

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